Daily News Online
  KRRISH SQUARE - Luxury Real Estate  

Tuesday, 16 October 2012

Home

 | SHARE MARKET  | EXCHANGE RATE  | TRADING  | OTHER PUBLICATIONS   | ARCHIVES | 

dailynews
 ONLINE


OTHER PUBLICATIONS


OTHER LINKS

Marriage Proposals
Classified
Government Gazette

AVIATION

Alaska Airlines and Boeing in $5 billion deal

Alaska Airlines will buy 50 Boeing 737 single-aisle jetliners under a $5 billion deal, the largest purchase in the carrier’s history, the companies said on Thursday.

“This order positions us for growth and ensures that we’ll continue to operate the quietest and most fuel-efficient aircraft available for the foreseeable future,” said Alaska Airlines president and CEO Brad Tilden.

The Seattle-based airline, which runs an all-Boeing fleet, will buy 20 737 MAX 8s, 17 737 MAX 9s and 13 Next-Generation 737-900ERs, under the contract. The new airplanes will be used to replace older aircraft and to support the airline’s anticipated growth, the company said.

“We value our longstanding relationship with Boeing and look forward to painting ‘Proudly All Boeing’ on the nose of our aircraft for many, many years into the future,” Tilden added. The 737 is a well-known and fuel-efficient workhorse mid-range aircraft in the aviation industry and the Seattle airline already operates 120 of them. “The 737 MAX will be a great addition to Alaska Airlines’ all-Boeing 737 fleet,” said Boeing Commercial Airplanes president and CEO Ray Conner.

“It will build on the strong record of operational and financial performance that Alaska Airlines has established with the 737 family,” he added. Alaska Airlines, is a subsidiary of the NYSE listed Alaska Air Group, andtogether with partner airlines, it serves 95 cities, with its hub at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

AFP


India’s Kingfisher cancels flights on labour woes

India’s cash-strapped Kingfisher Airlines cancelled all of its flights on Monday due to staff unrest, adding to doubts about the ailing private carrier’s future and sending its shares plunging.

R.K. Khanna, deputy director-general of India’s civil aviation regulator, said no Kingfisher flights had operated Monday and that they had summoned the carrier’s chief executive Sanjay Agarwal to discuss the problems on Tuesday.

“The airline will have to explain how long the cancellations will continue,” he told AFP.

Kingfisher, which is desperately in need of capital to keep flying, said earlier in the day it had cancelled some flights because of problems with staff, who have not been paid for months.

“A section of our employees have been threatening and manhandling other employees who are reporting to work. We are anticipating disruptions and delays of flights across our network,” airline spokesman Prakash Mirpuri said.

“With a view to mitigate the impact of these anticipated disruptions, we are proactively cancelling several flights across our network for October 1,” he said in the statement, adding the firm would talk to employees on the issue.

Kingfisher shares fell by their highest permissible daily limit, ending down 4.78 percent at 15.35 rupees on the Bombay Stock Exchange, following the news.

The Press Trust of India news agency reported some Kingfisher engineers had gone on strike to demand wages unpaid for seven months.

On Sunday night, passengers landing in big metros such as Delhi or Mumbai were stuck inside their aircraft as Kingfisher’s engineers refused to work and did not put safety wedges on aircraft tyres after landing, media reports said.

In other cases passengers could not disembark some planes as step ladders were not attached.

Kingfisher has faced a series of strikes by pilots and engineers over delays in salaries, and has cut international and several domestic flights to curb costs.

The company was India’s second-largest airline until a year ago but now has a market share of just 3.2 percent, the smallest of the country’s carriers.

Owner Vijay Mallya, a billionaire liquor baron, last week said he was in talks with foreign airlines to sell a stake in the firm after the government relaxed foreign investment rules.

Also last week, local banks -- which own a quarter of Kingfisher -- rejected a request from the company for another loan.

AFP

EMAIL |   PRINTABLE VIEW | FEEDBACK |

Millennium City
LANKAPUVATH - National News Agency of Sri Lanka
www.army.lk
Telecommunications Regulatory Commission of Sri Lanka (TRCSL)
www.news.lk
www.defence.lk
Donate Now | defence.lk
www.apiwenuwenapi.co.uk

| News | Editorial | Business | Features | Political | Security | Sport | World | Letters | Obituaries |

Produced by Lake House Copyright © 2012 The Associated Newspapers of Ceylon Ltd.

Comments and suggestions to : Web Editor